Cameron resigns following exit vote as contractors call for calm

David Cameron has resigned as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom this morning (24 June) after the country voted to leave the European Union.

He will step down in October after the UK voted to Leave by 52% to 48%.

The Prime Minister said: “The British people have voted to leave the European Union and their will must be respected. The will of the British people is an instruction that must be delivered.”

Mr Cameron, who had urged the country to vote Remain, said he would attempt to “steady the ship” over the coming weeks and months and added that “fresh leadership” was needed.

The vote has already had a profound affect on the Stock Market with the pound falling to its lowest level against the dollar since 1985.

The Civil Engineering Contractors Association (CECA) has called for calm following the Brexit vote.

Head of external affairs, Marie-Claude Hemming, said: “After a lengthy campaign, the UK public has voted to leave the European Union.

“The change in circumstance has unsettled the markets which, if unchecked, may discourage long-term investment  in UK infrastructure.

“The UK must act to secure its economy, but growth will only be delivered if supported by world-class infrastructure. CECA therefore calls on Ministers to now to first stabilise government, then re-establish their commitment to the projects outlined in the National Infrastructure Plan, most notably HS2 and a third runway at Heathrow in order to

maintain economic confidence, following such a substantial change in the UK’s relationship with the European Union and the rest of the world.”

In a statement, Carolyn Fairbairn, Confederation of British Industry (CBI) director-general, said: “The British people’s vote to leave the EU is a momentous turning point in our history. The country has spoken and it’s for us all to listen. Many businesses will be concerned and need time to assess the implications. But they are used to dealing with challenge and change and we should be confident they will adapt.

“The urgent priority now is to reassure the markets. We need strong and calm leadership from the government, working with the Bank of England, to shore up confidence and stability in the economy.

“The choices we make over the coming months will affect generations to come.”

Related Posts

 
Comments

No comments yet.